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Reaction Probabilities

In Fig. 1 we show the total reaction probabilities, $P^{J}
(E)$, for all $J$ that we have computed. The most obvious feature of this plot is the monotonic decline in $P^{J}
(E)$ with increasing $J$ at nearly every energy. In Fig. 2, we show the reaction probability for $J \geq 15$. Except for the structure caused by the overlapping resonances, the reaction probabilities increase in a nearly linear fashion with increasing energy. Similar to $J = 10$, all trace of the rapid rise in reaction probability at $E = 1.25$ eV, so evident at $J=0$ has totally disappeared.[2] It is also clear from Fig. 2 that averaging over $J$ will greatly dampen any resonance structure that persists at total higher angular momentum. Another important feature of the reaction probability profiles that is shown clearly in Fig. 2 is the absence of any ``energy shift'' resulting from centrifugal barriers. At each $J$, the reaction occurs at the threshold energy of $\approx .81$ eV, indicating that the coriolis terms are as important as the centrifugal ones. This point will be discussed further in a future article.[51]

In Fig. 3, we plot the total reaction probabilities but weighted by the $2J+1$ degeneracy factor. This plot gives a very different indication of the importance of the contribution of each partial wave to the overall reaction cross section than one might get from a casual glance at Fig. 1. We see that the contribution of $J=0$ is negligible. Moreover, the importance of each partial wave increases with $J$ until reaching a maximum near $J = 10 - 15$. For $E < 1.6$ eV the weighted reaction probability for $J=35$ and $J=5$ are similar with $J=5$ being greater for $E > 1.6$ eV.


next up previous
Next: Reaction Cross Sections Up: Results and Discussion Previous: Results and Discussion
Anthony J. H. M. Meijer 2000-10-05